White Stork nests and Humans

By | 20 June 2011
White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) is probably among few bird species that remarkably adapted to human activities. They started to take advantages of the rubbish dumps which provide an extra and constant food source throughout the year. This among other factors have lead to the development of sedentariness in the populations of southern Spain and northwest Africa (Morocco and Algeria). Most of the population of these regions (and other birds from Central Europe) don’t cross the Sahara desert and instead winter locally.
But its ability to nest on or near human settlements and on man-made objects remains one of its striking features. So, how many White Stork nests can be built in a single Telecommunication Pylon? That’s what the first two photographs try to answer (25 and 15 nests per pylon respectively). Is that a record number? Otherwise we would be eager to know what is the record.
25 nests of White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) in one pylon
25 nests (some not visible) of White Stork, Sidi Allal Tazi, central Morocco, 16 May 2011. (Rachid El Khamlichi).
15 nests of White Stork (Ciconia ciconia) in one pylon
15 nests of White Stork, Sidi Allal El Bahraoui, central Morocco, May 2011. (Abdelhak Elbanak).
Pair of White Stork with young in the town of Kénitra, 15 June 2011. (Mohamed Amezian)
Two occupied nests of White Stork in the town of Kénitra, 15 June 2011. (Mohamed Amezian)
An old nest (see that the position of the nest has moved a bit from the original base), Kénitra, 15 June 2011. (Mohamed Amezian)
Row of three (more nests are not visible) occupied nests of White Stork, Kénitra, 15 June 2011. (Mohamed Amezian)

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